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  • Game Informer News Feed: A Ghoulish Gas

    Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
    Developer: Other Ocean Interactive
    Release:
    Platform: PlayStation 4

    Fans of Sir Daniel Fortesque had a lot to be excited for when Sony revealed earlier this year that it had a remake of the first MediEvil in the works. Flash forward to Gamescom 2019 and we've finally gotten some hands-on time with this nostalgic return to Gallowmere. And from what we played, those looking for a more scenic trip down memory lane are going to be very happy.

    Like the recent Crash and Spyro remakes, MediEvil is a gorgeous and (obviously) massive upgrade over the original game when it comes to visuals. The first game was inspired by Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas and the remake does an excellent job of making everything look more akin to that stop motion class. The textures are smooth, the models more realistic than oddly shaped polygonal models, and the moon-adorned skybox is enchanting.

    The simple gameplay from the original is more or less retained. Weapon impacts land with a heavy thud and you can feel the weight behind your sword every time.  You can attack foes with a close encounters weapons like sword or Daniel's arm, which he can pop out of his socket. Long-range weapons like throwing knives help to whittle zombies and other foes down before you run in for the kill. 

    So far, MediEvil seems like it's going to be a real treat for players who adored the original game or those in search of a goofy, colorful hack & slash adventure when it comes to PS4 on October 25.

  • Game Informer News Feed: Giving Glorious Chase

    Publisher: Electronic Arts
    Developer: Ghost Games
    Release:
    Rating: Rating Pending
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

    There’s little doubt among fans that Need For Speed is also in need of some new life. The series' past few entries have been bogged down by intrusive microtransactions, poor storytelling, and lackluster settings. However, a beautiful new Miami-inspired metropolis called Palm City – as well as a particularly chaotic implementation of NFS’s classic boogeyman, the street-racer hating police force – might do just enough to propel the series back to the top.

    During Gamescom 2019, we got to spend 30 minutes fiddling with customization options and competing in two street races. There is a large array of customization options for those who want to deck out their rides. We were given a sleek-looking Mercedes AMG to play with in a garage before the first race, and I spent a few minutes switching out various models of canards, wheels, splitters, and skirts just to see how it would change the car’s look. Stance tuning, paint and decal options, and even modifying the sound of your exhaust are also options you can tweak. Alongside your car, you can customize your driver's hair, clothes, and shoes. There weren’t that many options in the demo, but they did run the gamut from mundane (like curly hair) to wacky – including being able to don serial killer masks.

    The difference between the two races in the demo are night and day – literally. The first race has you gunning around Palm City’s harbor, passing ships and dockworkers in a giant circle. Heat leans more in the direction of arcadey than realistic, with turbo-boosted collisions and spectacular particle effects creating the sorts of crashes that wouldn’t be out of place in The Fast And The Furious. Hitting the nitro, which slowly refills over the race, sends you barreling ahead at breakneck speed for a brief instance of time, letting you hit trees hard enough you rip them for their roots and smashing small walls to pieces. The nitro is also practical, with careful uses of it letting you overtake other racers at a critical juncture. Admittedly, outside of the spectacle and how satisfying it is to pull off a tight turn and eclipse your opponents, the day race is traditional, without any notable modifiers or hooks to make it stand out. The next race, which takes place at night, is anything but and does a great job of demonstrating the tension and surprising amount of emergent storytelling that Heat is aiming for.

    The race which took me and the A.I.-controlled racers through the middle of Palm City, crossing through busy intersections and tearing across bridges, started normal enough. We zipped down the road, ramming into one another as we vied for an early lead. However, once I hit the nitro, cop cars showed up out of nowhere. Unlike the cops in Payback and the 2015 reboot, these officers were much more relentless – usefully so. Bumping into cops calls in more cops. When I realized that, I started ramming every one I saw, creating an influx of police cruisers that were smashing into my opponents’ cars and sending them flying off the road. My agent of chaos strategy eventually backfired, as one plowed right into me and forced me to lose the race. However, in the moment, the thrill was so exciting that the loss wasn’t even close to being a bitter pill.

    That’s not where the fun ends either. After a night race concludes, the police will chase you, forcing you to evade them and seek out a safe house. This might sound like a chore on paper, but I found the experience immensely entertaining as I darted through alleyways and crashed through barriers in a desperate attempt to evade cruisers and SWAT vans as they tried to bounce me around like a ball. Hearing the officers have detailed, convincing conversations over the police scanner about what me and the other racers were doing also added to the tension and made the chase feel particularly cinematic.

    In the end, the justice brigade got me with a spike strip and a fantastic pile-up spectacle that rivals any of the police chases I’ve had in Grand Theft Auto V thanks to the overwhelming aggression and limited means to fight back. There is no other means of defense except your skills behind the wheel. Be crafty or get caught, losing whatever prize money (used to buy upgrades for your car) you gained during the race while also gaining some reputation currency. It’s not clear yet what reputation affects in the game.

    There remains a number of questions about how Heat will handle progression and storytelling. However, the strength and intensity of the demo we played as well as EA’s confirmation that Heat is ditching lootboxes entirely after Payback’s grindy inclusion of them has our hopes up that this entry might be the one that puts the series back on track.

  • Game Informer News Feed: The Yakuza Remastered Collection Is A Pretty Solid Way To Revisit The Classics
    Publisher: SEGA
    Developer: Ryu Ga Gotoku Studios
    Release:
    Rating: Mature
    Platform: PlayStation 4

    Yesterday, Sega simultaneously announced the existence of The Yakuza Remastered Collection and released the first part. The collection, which is initially available as a sort of season pass, includes remastered versions of the PS3 games Yakuza 3, 4, and 5, running at 1080p and 60 fps on the PlayStation 4. 

    I asked series producer Daisuke Sato why the games aren't getting the full Kiwami treatment, and he says it came down to a question of time. If his team were to fully remake those games, it would require their full attention and would take more than three years. Since the games featured in this collection were originally released on PlayStation 3, the visuals hold up significantly better than their PlayStation 2 predecessors. 

    Yakuza 3 is available now, and the next games in the series will be unlocked automatically as the team completes the remastering process. Yakuza 4 is slated for an October 29 release, and Yakuza 5 should be unlocking February 11, 2020. February 11 is also the release date for a limited run of physical copies of the game – the first time Yakuza 5 is available as a physical release in North America. To mark that occasion, the Day One Edition of the game includes a PS3 case for Yakuza 5, to let collectors fill the gap on their shelves.

    Click here to watch embedded media

    I played a bit of the Yakuza 3 remake, and while it's a noticeable step down from the Kiwami games – crowds have a tendency to pop into view and the UI is a bit clunky – it's fairly easy on the eyes overall. More than anything, as someone who got on board with the series when Yakuza 0 was released, I'm excited to finally fill in an important gap in Kiryu's saga.

    The Yakuza Remastered Collection is available for digital purchase now for $59.99, which is the same price as the Day One Edition.

     

  • Game Informer News Feed: Solve Your Problems With Diplomacy Or Force

    Greedfall

    Publisher: Focus Home Interactive
    Developer: Spiders Studios
    Release:
    Rating: Rating Pending
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

    Greedfall, an upcoming RPG from Spiders Studios, tasks you with traversing a dangerous world full of warring factions and a horrible plague with seemingly no cure. However, while you can certainly skewer your adversaries with your sword or blast them away with magic, your character is often better off solving their problems using their words.

    After customizing your character, including choosing between male or female, you take control of De Sardet, a diplomat from the Old Continent, a plague-riddled, overpopulated, and polluted region. They travel to Teerfradee, an island rumored to hold a mysterious means for a cure.

    As a member of a neutral faction De Sardet acts as an intermediary between the warring factions on Teerfradee. Many of the interactions you have with other people is through dialogue, with traits like charisma playing a major role in what kind of convincing they can get away with. However, if the action heats up, De Sardet is more than capable in a fight.

    Greedfall

    I witness the power of the De Sardet I’m playing during my brief hands-on demo as a herd of buff beasts known as Tenlan circle around her. Using her magic, I loft ranged light attacks their way, before getting up close for the killing blow: a short-range heavy attack in the form of an energy burst. I love how the combat feels, but if it’s a bit too chaotic for you, you can use a tactical pause to allow you to queue up attacks and strategies. If you’d rather keep things flowing naturally, you can also map many of the tactical pause abilities to the d-pad.

    This De Sardet was upgraded with magic in mind, so she can also use short-distance warps to dodge incoming attacks and get the upper hand on enemies. However, that doesn’t mean she’s completely useless if things get physical; slashing through the beasts to finish off the last remaining creatures is satisfying and effective. You can also craft customization items for De Sardet’s outfit, which can also grant boosts to stats, as well as differentiate them cosmetically.

    With Greedfall putting such an emphasis on interactions with other characters in the world, choosing the right companions for your current objective is critical. You can recruit five different companions: Kurt is a respected mercenary, Siora is a native to the island with a justifiable hatred of the xenophobic sentiments brought by the other factions, Vasco is a member of the thoroughly religious magic faction called Theleme, Petrus is a member of the high-seas-traveling faction known as Naut, and Aphra is a scholar from the science-focused Bridge Alliance. With so many different personalities and loyalties in this group, you need to be careful when you choose which two to bring on adventure with you.

    Greedfall

    In addition to forming relationships with these characters through side missions and conversation trees, you can also romance your companions; in the very first conversation in my demo, I shoot my shot with Kurt, only to fail miserably.

    Greedfall is impressive and ambitious, with beautiful graphics, a fun combat system, and intriguing promises about how much power your dialogue has. Thankfully, the wait to launch isn't a long one, and it hits PS4, Xbox One, and PC on September 10.

  • Game Informer News Feed: What Sets The New Horde Mode Apart From Its Predecessors

    Click here to watch embedded media

    Publisher: Xbox Game Studios
    Developer: The Coalition
    Release:
    Rating: Mature
    Platform: Xbox One, PC

    Ever since Gears of War 2, Horde mode has been a staple of Xbox's bloody shooting franchise. The ceaseless exhilaration of digging in your heels and defending a point from progressively difficult waves of enemies has kept players coming back for more, and it's always exciting to see how the team behind the series ups the ante with each passing entry. With Gears 5, The Coalition keeps the core conceit the same – players join up with a squad to fight off 50 waves of increasingly difficult monsters – but the developer is changing several elements that turn the series mainstay on its head.

    The biggest alteration is similar to ones we've seen in the game's other modes: the appearance of hero-shooter-lite mechanics. Much like Arcade mode in competitive multiplayer and the new Escape, the character you chooses has sweeping consequences for how you play. At launch, players can choose from nine characters: six from the Gears universe, two from the Halo: Reach universe, and one from the Terminator universe. Yes, you read that right: the launch roster consists of Marcus, Kait, JD, Del, Fahz, Jack, Emile-A239 and Kat-B320 from Halo: Reach, and Sarah Connor from Terminator.

    For Gears 5's Horde, each character has a passive and an ultimate ability. While the passive abilities are important, ultimate abilities have the potential to turn a disastrous wave into a successful one. Hopelessly pinned down? Activate Kait's camouflage ultimate to turn her invisible and get the perfect flank on your enemies. Desperately need some backup? Del's ultimate summons tracker robots that target nearby enemies. Some ultimates also affect nearby allies, like Marcus' Living Legend ability, which grants him and all nearby players auto headshots. If you use that ultimate in conjunction with Fahz's X-Ray ability which lets him see and shoot through walls, he'll be able to blast away Swarm skulls through walls with deadly efficiency.

    While the characters from Halo: Reach and Terminator are interesting additions, Jack is perhaps the most unique addition. Yes, Jack, the hovering robot that hacks things for the COGs. Unlike the other characters, Jack can't inflict massive damage. Instead, the handy little bot hovers around the battlefield, shocking enemies into a stunned state. Stunned enemies stand upright, opening them up to easy shots from Jack's allies. Jack can also boost teammates, making him extra handy. Jack's ultimate allows him to hijack an enemy on the battlefield and wreak havoc using all their abilities.

    To encourage players to avoid just digging into a single spot and camping, enemies now drop power orbs, which players must collect if they want to level their characters and their perks within the match. Thankfully, the obtained power is split evenly between all teammates, so if you want to let the team dig in while a more nimble character like Kait (who also has a built-in safety net in her ultimate ability if things get too hairy), you don't need to worry about one character monopolizing the power-up points.

    With Escape, competitive multiplayer, Horde, and the campaign now out in the open, Gears 5 is looking like compelling, robust package. I'm looking forward to seeing which modes I sink the most time into when it launches September 10 on Xbox One and PC.

  • Game Informer News Feed: Visual Concepts Promises To Ease The Grind In MyCareer

    Publisher: 2K Sports
    Developer: Visual Concepts
    Release:
    Rating: Everyone 10+
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Switch, PC

    Like clockwork, every year NBA 2K releases, a segment of the gaming community picks up the megaphone and shouts down the MyCareer mode, which was often accused of being too grindy and too geared toward encouraging players to spend a little extra cash to ease the pain of raising your player from a 60 overall rating to a respectable level. NBA 2K19 made it easier to earn VC, but many (like me) argued it still took too long to get good and kneecapped an otherwise strong experience. NBA 2K20 hopes to make this complaint a thing of the past with a dramatically faster upgrade process. 

    You still start as a 60 overall player, but when I asked how long it takes to raise your rating to the 80s, senior producer Ben Bishop says "we're talking weeks instead of months." The change should encourage more users to create mutiple characters for use in the Jordan Rec League and the Park, which is a net win for the series. This eased grind is just one of the promising things we learned about NBA 2K20's revamped MyCareer mode. Here are the other noteworthy features:

    New MyPlayer Builder Encourages Experimentation

    Player development in previous NBA 2K games was a bit of a guessing game because you never knew how your player would top out and what they would feel like at their apex until you put in the hundreds of hours to get there. The new MyPlayer builder feature (which you can check out yourself today) gives you unprecedented control over your baller, allowing you to tweak their base values, choose their takeover, and set their potential cap for each major skill. The flexible system provides over 100 different archetypes to peruse, and once you've carved the outline for your player, you can actually test them out. Before you take them on the court, you can select the overall rating you want to try them out at and then assign your preferred badges from the giant list of options. NBA 2K20's revamped badge system breaks them down across four categories – finishing, shooting, playmaking, and defense/rebounding. Many favorites return, but the game also introduces 50 new ones. Bishop says you can save up to 10 archetypes, and once you start a career with a particular archetype you can clear out that build, giving you plenty of room to lab new builds and keep your favorites.

    New Progression System Introduces Badge Flexibilty

    To unlock a badge, you no longer have to grind a particular way. For instance, if you wanted to earn the Corner Specialist badge last year, you would have to take shot after shot in the corner. Now, the badge unlock meters track across the four badge categories, meaning no matter what shot you take, you are earning experience that eventually allows you to choose any badge in the category. Every time you level up one of the four categories, you also have a chance to respec your badges in that category, so you don't have to worry about wasting a valuable upgrade point on a badge that doesn't work the way you hoped it would. 

    The progression changes dramatically once you read a 95-overall rating as well. "Once you hit 95, then it becomes all about how you play, what competition you're going up against, and you're essentially trying to chase that 99," Bishop says. "So if you're winning games, you're playing really well to move up in small increments, you'll be going up by tenths of a point. You'll get to 95.6, 96.3. But the other thing that we've never done before is now this falls back, This has nothing to do with you deciding what to use your VC toward, this is just based on what you're doing on the court. So if you playing well, you'll go up and you're not playing so well you'll drop back down. The key there is to try and keep your level of play high so you can get up to 99. You won't fall below 95, obviously, but if you're not playing ball, you're just kind of be stuck there."

    The progression from 95 to 99 is much more weighted toward competitive players than those who prefer to dominate the CPU in the NBA games. You can still get up to 99 playing in the NBA eventually, but 

    LeBron James Helped Produce The Storyline

    This year's MyCareer story comes to us courtesy of SpringHill Entertainment, the production house created by LeBron James and his longtime associate Maverick Carter. Directed by Sheldon Candis, the story features arguably the best cast of any NBA 2K game to date, featuring star actors Idris Elba (The Wire, Beasts of No Nation) and Rosario Dawson (Deathproof, He Got Game), plus a who's who of NBA stars. The story follows the career of Che, a star player for the fictitious Bay City Flames whose career trajectory derails following a showdown with his head coach regarding the treatment of an injured teammate. Fighting through the controversy, Che must fight against the perception that his social justice position makes him a problematic locker room presence and rebuild his reputation during the Portsmouth Invitiational and Draft Combine. Do well enough and teams may ask for an individual workout. You decide which workouts to take, which is the game's way of having some say over which team you may ultimately end up on. As long as you don't stink up the workout, chances are one of those teams will take a flyer on you. 

    Locker Rooms Feel More Alive

    The story cutscenes are still heavily weighted toward cracking an NBA roster at the beginning of your player's professional career, but Visual Concepts has also added more moments that play out in and around the locker room that make you feel like a bigger part of an NBA team. You'll see more cutscenes featuring your teammates and coaches, and instead of just one style of press interview you will occaisionally do full press conferences like past NBA games, be in the middle of a press scrum, or asked to do a one-on-one interivew.

    Past games did a bad job of keeping you abreast of team and league happenings – sometimes you wouldn't even know if a teammate was traded until you walked onto the court. This year, a radio program plays in the background when you're in the locker room that keeps you better informed. If they mention a teammate went down with an injury, you will even see them getting worked on in the trainer's room on game day.

    Visual Concept also added a nice flourish for winners. If you capture an NBA championship, you can experience the celebratory parade in the Neighborhood. 

    You Have More Control Over Your Career Trajectory

    The modern NBA experiences seismic shifts when star players plot ways to play together, whether via trade or free agency. To better reflect this culture where players dictate roster creation almost as much as general managers do, MyCareer now offers more straightforward ways to influence your team composition. 

    "We had elements of this in the past, but one of the things you can do when you get to a certain level with the team is ask them to try to trade for some people, and also give them a list of people you want them to sign in free agency," Bishop says.

    Once the team decides you are a critical part of their franchise moving forward you will get these tools to help determine your roster. Bishop says it happens a lot earlier in your career than it would in previous games.

     

  • Gamespot News Feed: Telling Lies Review - False Faces

    There's an intrinsically guilty draw about looking into the private lives of others--a burgeoning curiosity that pulls humans to tell stories, to gossip, to spy on one another. The psychology of that feeling is at the heart of Telling Lies, a game that really isn't about much more than watching the intimate communications of other people. The game leverages a human desire to pry into others' lives, and that feeling that we're doing something wrong helps to make the draw even more powerful.

    That feeling is how Telling Lies gets away with being a video game that doesn't really contain much of a "game," per se. As with its predecessor, Her Story, director and writer Sam Barlow lets the idea of uncovering the sordid details of someone else's life lead you through the experience. Where Her Story was something of an experiment with the idea--you skim through a database of unordered full-motion video clips that slowly expose a mystery concerning a woman who was questioned by police--Telling Lies is the larger-scale execution. There are more characters, more videos, and more details to uncover. The question of how much you'll enjoy Telling Lies is very much linked to how far your curiosity will carry you.

    No Caption Provided
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    To that end, there's no good way to explain what Telling Lies is about without ruining it. The game starts with a clip of a woman returning to her apartment and plugging a hard drive into a computer, which gives her access to a secret National Security Agency database of videos snaked from the Internet; essentially, a series of Skype or FaceTime calls made or received by a man named David. As with Her Story, the reason those videos are worth perusing, and why the privacy of these people is worth invading, is something you have to glean for yourself. As the title suggests, not everybody is fully honest with each other, and much of the game is a meditation on the deceptions humans employ every day in all their interactions. The face we show one person is different from the one we wear for another--and even what we tell ourselves is potentially suspect.

    Uncovering the lies and the reasoning behind them will likely keep you pretty well enraptured through the game's eight or so hours of video, especially in the early and middle portions when there are plenty of revelations waiting for you to unearth them. Nuanced performances help in that regard as well, even though the actors are mostly just staring into cameras and emoting. You'll probably recognize the members of the strong cast, led by Logan Marshall-Green (Prometheus, Upload), Alexandra Shipp (Dark Phoenix, Love, Simon), Kerry Bishé (Halt and Catch Fire, Narcos), and Angela Sarafyan (Westworld, American Horror Story). It's not hard to imagine Telling Lies as a Netflix show if it were presented a little differently. The game part of watching all those videos--and there are a lot of them, upwards of 160--usually is found in figuring out what you're not seeing or hearing in each one.

    All of Telling Lies takes place on a computer screen, where you can dig around on the stolen hard drive for additional context (or even play Solitaire), and poking around a bit gives some handy facts about what you're viewing. In order to make sure this particular NSA Big Brother program passes Constitutional muster, the videos can't be watched chronologically. You can only search for a clip using keywords, and when you uncover a conversation, you can only see one side of it at a time. Watching each clip is a chance to learn more about the people in it--but you'll also need to pay close enough attention to figure out what words to try next that will help you uncover more of the story, or what words the other person might be using so you can track down their side of the interaction.

    That system is nearly identical to the one in Her Story, with a few improvements. In Telling Lies, you can scrub through videos at various speeds by dragging your mouse to the sides of the screen. You'll start each video at the keyword with which you found it, so discovering context requires you to dig further into every video. Each selection also includes subtitles, and you can click any subtitled word while watching to use it as a keyword, making searching around a little easier--or allowing you to chase down a thread as soon as you see it.

    No Caption Provided

    As noted, Telling Lies is an expansion of the ideas inherent to Her Story, and so it includes a lot of the same high points--and drawbacks. It's very much a title in which you need to make your own fun. Uncovering interesting tidbits about the characters or finally drawing a connection between one event and another is satisfying, but that also means that the "game" part of Telling Lies largely exists in your own mind. There's little to push you forward other than your own desire to know more, and you'll largely create your own objectives and climaxes in the form of "Aha!" moments along the way.

    The disjointed nature of the story also means that it's up to you to impose your own structure on it. Telling Lies doesn't have easy-to-follow traditional storytelling elements like a rising action or climax. It's possible (although really unlikely) to spot the final video in the sequence immediately after watching the first. Filling in the gaps is part of solving the mystery, but at the same time, Telling Lies pretty much ends when you get bored of searching or hit a wall and can't come up with any fresh keywords. A timer running on the screen lets you know how much of the in-game night you've wiled away with your inquiries. The game implies you've only got until dawn to find everything you can before you're inevitably snapped up by the authorities for stealing the database. But come 5:45 a.m., the timer stalls (or at least, it did after I hit the button ending the story once and then loaded an earlier save to dig around some more). That allows you infinite opportunities to keep searching, but it also seems the ticking clock is more a contrivance than an actual system, so again, you're not actually working toward anything other than your own satisfaction.

    No Caption Provided

    That's never more true than when you trigger Telling Lies' ending, essentially by clicking an "I'm done" button as dawn approaches. Though you've dug through what is (seemingly) an illegal NSA database and your arrest is likely imminent, you get only a vague sense of what the information is for and what you're doing with it now that you have it. A final report that gives you a sense of how much of the game you completed and what most often drew your interest gives some suggestion of your character's final actions, but you're not compiling the raw data into a clear story, nor are you really leveraging it against the powers that be that are hunting you. Depending on which of the characters' videos you saw the most of, you'll get one of three endings that explains the aftermath of the two years of events you've just witnessed--but that's it, and it's unsatisfying to just see one conclusion of several intertwining narratives. And in the end, you're just watching videos, making connections, and then turning the game off.

    It's in the ending that Telling Lies feels a bit undercooked. The mechanics, writing, and performances create a real feeling of peering into someone else's private world all the way through, but the game doesn't give you much in the way of agency, especially if you endeavor to uncover every single video. Telling Lies never really answers a fundamental question raised by its very nature and structure: So what? The game's final report seems to suggest that you're taking part in crafting a narrative as a viewer, as if the act of uncovering and watching these videos creates a complete, subjective narrative for whoever sees them next--but you're only a passive part of that process, and you don't know you're taking part in it until it's over. The game might be telling you that you've had an effect on what someone else might see, but you don't get a chance to actually make any decisions in that process, or to separate truths from deceptions; you only get to watch.

    The mechanics, writing, and performances create a real feeling of peering into someone else's private world all the way through, but the game doesn't give you much in the way of agency.

    Telling Lies offers you the opportunity to delve into the intimate connections between people, to uncover who they are possibly to a deeper extent than even they realize. The production values and performances in particular make Telling Lies feel true and immediate, elevating the game's conceit that you're taking part in something forbidden and possibly sinister, even as you work as a digital detective. In that way, it's contemporary and meaningful as a game that uses interactivity in a unique way to explore how we relate to one another. But Telling Lies struggles to find meaning in that exploration. Its interactivity is only skin deep, like the lies its characters tell one another. As a further expansion of Barlow's ideas about what games can be, Telling Lies is a success. It's unfortunate that, in the end, it doesn't further embrace its interactive possibilities.

  • Game Informer News Feed: The Cell Saga

    Click here to watch embedded media

    Publisher: Bandai Namco
    Developer: CyberConnect2
    Release: 2020
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

    The latest trailer for Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot showcases the inclusion of the Cell saga in the action/RPG as well as showing a glimpse of the game world where you'll fly around on a Nimbus Cloud, collect apples, and eat to gain strength.

    The father/son relationship of Goku and Gohan takes center stage in the new trailer, foreshadowing the ultimate showdown with Cell.

    Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot comes out for the PS4, Xbox One, and PC in early 2020.

  • Game Informer News Feed: The Cell Saga

    Click here to watch embedded media

    Publisher: Bandai Namco
    Developer: CyberConnect2
    Release: 2020
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

    The latest trailer for Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot showcases the inclusion of the Cell saga in the action/RPG as well as showing a glimpse of the game world where you'll fly around on a Nimbus Cloud, collect apples, and eat to gain strength.

    The father/son relationship of Goku and Gohan takes center stage in the new trailer, foreshadowing the ultimate showdown with Cell.

    Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot comes out for the PS4, Xbox One, and PC in early 2020.

  • Game Informer News Feed: The Cell Saga

    Click here to watch embedded media

    Publisher: Bandai Namco
    Developer: CyberConnect2
    Release: 2020
    Platform: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC

    The latest trailer for Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot showcases the inclusion of the Cell saga in the action/RPG as well as showing a glimpse of the game world where you'll fly around on a Nimbus Cloud, collect apples, and eat to gain strength.

    The father/son relationship of Goku and Gohan takes center stage in the new trailer, foreshadowing the ultimate showdown with Cell.

    Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot comes out for the PS4, Xbox One, and PC in early 2020.

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